Ten Chapters done – ten to go

The book-in-a-week workshop I took with April Kihlstrom was excellent. I wish I could recycle the free time I’d purposely scheduled for that week so I could use and reuse it, again and again. Alas, free time isn’t always easy to come by.

However, the flow is still there. What I learned from the workshop is how to silence that inner editor. At least for a little while. I find I am now able to let go of ‘perfection’ and just write. I find myself falling deeper and deeper into character and watching – as a reader – the story develop right in front of me. There are times now when I’m writing so quickly, so firmly inside my character’s head, that I’m left breathless and wishing I could simply turn the page and see what happens next. How cool to fall so deeply into the story that I forget I’m its creator.

Now, just because I’ve hogtied and gagged my inner editor, don’t think I’m writing sloppy. I’m just writing fast because I’ve finally – FINALLY – realized this first draft is for my eyes only. It doesn’t matter if I replace a couple of key descriptive words with ???’s, it doesn’t matter if I’m not sure whether hero and heroine are traveling north or east. What matters is that mood, voice and flow of story remain constant. And constant happens naturally when there’s forward motion only – not back and forth nit-picking until that inner editor is somewhat satisfied.

I’ve now come to the middle of my story. Chapter 10. Over and out. Just days ago, I’d finished Chapter 9 and struggled – as usual – to ‘start’ the next chapter. The beauty of this is that I can reread the last couple of paragraphs I’d written and I’m immediately sucked back into the story and ready to roll… when free time allows.

Now if only I could find a way to hogtie time…

13 Responses to Ten Chapters done – ten to go

  • Fantastic, Debbie! You’ve made wonderful progress, and silencing that nasty little editor in your mind is so helpful. Keep writing!

    Linda

  • Thanks, Lyndi! That little editor might be silent now, but she’s making all kinds of notes for later… I just know it! LOL.
    ~Debbie

  • Thanks, Lyndi! That little editor might be silent now, but she’s making all kinds of notes for later… I just know it! LOL.
    ~Debbie

  • Debbie, you are so industrious. Glad to hear the flow is there. Bet you’re writing a great story.

  • I have been meaning to try book-in-a-week but haven’t gotten around to it. After reading about your success perhaps I will have to make it a priority this summer. Great job!

  • Just learning that you CAN silence the internal critic temporarily is a huge step. Way to go. Cheering you on.
    Linda

  • Just learning that you CAN silence the internal critic temporarily is a huge step. Way to go. Cheering you on.
    Linda

  • Just learning that you CAN silence the internal critic temporarily is a huge step. Way to go. Cheering you on.
    Linda

  • Just learning that you CAN silence the internal critic temporarily is a huge step. Way to go. Cheering you on.
    Linda

  • Kathleen,
    I think what you see as industrious is actually my ‘perfectionist’ side. :-/ But thank you. 🙂

    Beth,
    One thing to remember if you do this book-in-a-week, is that you don’t actually HAVE to write a book in a week. Just having this new attitude toward writing is worth it for me. I finished three chapters (I think) in our week of writing. A far cry from a whole book – BUT, the class changed my outlook and I’m writing faster and better than before. And if you take this class, let us know so we can cheer you on!!

    Linda,
    You are so right – it IS a huge step. That’s why my writing is stronger – because I’m ignoring that inner critic. When you don’t stop to analyze each word, the story flows with a new sense of clarity. It’s why I look forward to solid blocks of quiet time now – so I can write something new, not wrangle with words I’ve already written.

    ~Debbie

  • Kathleen,
    I think what you see as industrious is actually my ‘perfectionist’ side. :-/ But thank you. 🙂

    Beth,
    One thing to remember if you do this book-in-a-week, is that you don’t actually HAVE to write a book in a week. Just having this new attitude toward writing is worth it for me. I finished three chapters (I think) in our week of writing. A far cry from a whole book – BUT, the class changed my outlook and I’m writing faster and better than before. And if you take this class, let us know so we can cheer you on!!

    Linda,
    You are so right – it IS a huge step. That’s why my writing is stronger – because I’m ignoring that inner critic. When you don’t stop to analyze each word, the story flows with a new sense of clarity. It’s why I look forward to solid blocks of quiet time now – so I can write something new, not wrangle with words I’ve already written.

    ~Debbie

  • Kathleen,
    I think what you see as industrious is actually my ‘perfectionist’ side. :-/ But thank you. 🙂

    Beth,
    One thing to remember if you do this book-in-a-week, is that you don’t actually HAVE to write a book in a week. Just having this new attitude toward writing is worth it for me. I finished three chapters (I think) in our week of writing. A far cry from a whole book – BUT, the class changed my outlook and I’m writing faster and better than before. And if you take this class, let us know so we can cheer you on!!

    Linda,
    You are so right – it IS a huge step. That’s why my writing is stronger – because I’m ignoring that inner critic. When you don’t stop to analyze each word, the story flows with a new sense of clarity. It’s why I look forward to solid blocks of quiet time now – so I can write something new, not wrangle with words I’ve already written.

    ~Debbie

  • Kathleen,
    I think what you see as industrious is actually my ‘perfectionist’ side. :-/ But thank you. 🙂

    Beth,
    One thing to remember if you do this book-in-a-week, is that you don’t actually HAVE to write a book in a week. Just having this new attitude toward writing is worth it for me. I finished three chapters (I think) in our week of writing. A far cry from a whole book – BUT, the class changed my outlook and I’m writing faster and better than before. And if you take this class, let us know so we can cheer you on!!

    Linda,
    You are so right – it IS a huge step. That’s why my writing is stronger – because I’m ignoring that inner critic. When you don’t stop to analyze each word, the story flows with a new sense of clarity. It’s why I look forward to solid blocks of quiet time now – so I can write something new, not wrangle with words I’ve already written.

    ~Debbie

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